About Event | Registration | News | 2016-10-05 09:00:00 2016-10-06 18:00:00 Europe/London theIJC.com Annual InkJet Conference 2016 Dusseldorf Germany ESMA info@esma.com

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TheIJC.com - 4th Annual InkJet Conference - Dusseldorf, 24 - 25 October 2017. The place to be for Inkjet Engineering and Inkjet Chemistry    Tickets Now Available

Programme

The conference programme for 2017 will be announced at a later date. Below you can see programme details from the 2016 edition.

  • DAY 1 - Track 1 (05.10.2016)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    08:30
    Registration and tabletop networking
    09:20 drupa 2016 – post show industry & technology trends Sabine Geldermann drupa
    09:30
    Inkjet market developments in print and packaging
    Smithers Pira
    In the wake of a raft of announcements and introductions at drupa showing inkjet is as productive as litho and flexo the adoption of inkjet in commercial and publishing print is continuing to grow. In packaging and labels the potential for major disruption by inkjet is enormous. Smithers Pira will share our market data and forecasts on how inkjet is continuing to shape the future of print and printed packaging with better quality, productivity and economics, making inkjet – in all its various technical iterations – more competitive.
    10:00
    Variable data in industrial inkjet printing
    Polytype
    Mass customisation is often mentioned as an important driver for digital printing – but can emerging industrial inkjet printing applications easily adopt existing variable printing solutions which are already well established for transactional printing and labels? This presentation will highlight the important factors for variable data in industrial inkjet printing: What applications exist, and which ones are likely to create an added value? What technological requirements and current solutions exist? How can variable data be defined and what lifecycle does it have? Wifag//Polytype as the market leader in direct-to-shape inkjet printing for metal and plastic packaging is often confronted with these very questions and is working together with its customers to meet the demanding innovation requirements of the market.
    10:30
    Inkjet developments and solutions for food and pharma packaging
    Kao Collins
    There is a huge demand for inkjet solutions for food and pharma packaging applications. This presentation discusses some of the alternative solutions including UV curable, EB curable and water based inks. The chemistries and curing technologies used for inkjet applications are developing rapidly, which opens up new opportunities. The objective of the presentation is to provide the audience with realistic expectations about what is and isn’t achievable and what is likely to be achievable in the near future.
    11:00
    Networking coffee break
    11:30
    Improving surface cure with UVC LEDs
    Excelitas Technologies
    UV LED solutions have demonstrated the ability to successfully replace older mercury lamp solutions in a number of curing applications by providing reduced operational costs through longer lifespans, reduced electrical consumption, higher reliability and reduced heating of substrates. At the same time, formulation modification has enabled the use of an increasing number of UV LED curable adhesives, inks, and coatings for commercial applications. In a number of applications such as UV curable coatings, there are still limitations for UV LED curing, preventing wide commercial adoption. Among the available formulations, the variation in curing performance is quite large and surface cure remains the biggest challenge to overcome with LED curing. When using LED based light sources, additional exposure to deep-UV irradiation or curing under inert-gas blanketing is most often required to achieve a tack-free surface. Post exposure to deep-UV LEDs is an attractive solution that is investigated in greater depth to explore irradiance, dose and wavelength requirements for industrial curing solutions. In addition, the feasibility of adding deep-UVC LEDs into a commercial LED curing system is also discussed.
    12:00
    Inkjet solutions for in-line packaging
    Industrial Inkjet
    To provide solutions for high resolution variable data or short run print onto packaging materials, the demands are for high speed (typically 200 to 300m/min), reliability and quality. To achieve them, a whole system approach is required including the latest inkjet printheads, inks, curing technologies and verification systems. Together these can deliver a true in-line solution, but the challenges should not be underestimated. Areas covered in this presentation include: multiple head arrays to achieve high print speeds, ink/substrate interaction, UV curing at high speed, ink choice (low migration versus water-based/hybrid), inspection and verification.
    12:30
    Providing the durable and robust SiMEMS products needed for the industrial digital printing marketplace
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    With over 30 years of piezo inkjet development experience and over a decade focusing on delivering Full Silicon MEMS inkjet printheads to the market, Dimatix will use this opportunity to share some of the advantages that its sputtered PZT technology can bring to the marketplace. This powerful technology is core to Dimatix printhead’s design and function. In this presentation Dimatix will detail the unique properties of sputtered PZT and describe how they overcame the early challenges to deliver meaningful innovation into the industry, enabling FUJIFILM Dimatix to offer products into the market capable of over 25 trillion actuations per nozzle.
    13:00
    Networking lunch
    14:30
    Increasing efficiency of UV-LED curing systems
    Integration Technology
    While UV-LED curing technology is steady increasing in market share and opening new opportunities for UV-curing, also the UV-LED development is not standing still and developing faster than ever. The efficiency and availability of high power UV-LED chips is in this regard of the same importance as building high performance curing systems out of it. Mixed wave length, highest power levels and different dosage not only have an important influence on the efficiency of the UV-LED device but also on the overall curing result. With that in mind, we will have a look at the latest chip innovations, array design and cooling of LEDs. In addition, we will sneak in future developments and have a look at some of the hurdles needed to overcome.
    15:00
    Ejecting high-performance materials: Archipelago Technology’s Powerdrop print engine
    Archipelago Technology Group
    Inkjet is moving into large-scale, industrial applications. This is leading to greater demands on the appearance, function, and performance of the printed surface – which requires the use of engineered materials such as glazes, high-performance adhesives, and tough paints. To meet this demand we have developed Powerdrop. Powerdrop is designed to eject a wide range of high performance materials, including ceramic glaze, hot melt adhesive and industrial paints. The Powerdrop print engine is highly scalable in terms of width and linear speed and will enable inkjet to excel in these important markets.
    15:30
    Resists & more – industrial processes with inkjet printable resists
    KIWO
    Using a resist, a glass surface can be masked with a design, either partially or all-over, prior to further finishing, processing or transportation, thus protecting them from outside influences. The resists are medium to highly viscous emulsions and depending on the product, can either be screen printed or applied by spraying, roller coating or dipping. Inkjet resist for partial sputtering (PVD): Sputtering, also called magnetron sputter coating, is the removal of precious metal atoms, such as platinum or gold, in a vacuum chamber by energetic ion bombardment, to coat a substrate with the sputtered metal particles. This coating has mainly functional reasons and is common for heat reflection at architectural glass. The same application method is used for decorative sputter coating of architectural glass. Only that for the decorative sputter coating the metallic deposition is applied partially and not over the entire surface.
    16:00
    Networking coffee break
    16:30
    Performance and energy saving with air-cooled UV curing technologies
    GEW
    The best choice of UV curing technology depends on the exact printing application and will determine optimum production efficiency in terms of both performance and cost. GEW has developed its own unique fully air-cooled hybrid UV technology that allows an arc system and an LED system to work in parallel on the same machine. The systems are tailored to take into account which characteristics in regard to output power, ink formulation and substrate temperature sensitivity need to be satisfied. Now substantial energy savings and performance gains can be realised by optimising the UV installation to suit the process perfectly, maximising ink compatibility and increasing machine productivity. The intelligent combination of hybrid UV technology, electronic power supply and digital controls will optimise processes, maximise ink compatibility and increase machine productivity.
    17:00
    Trying to overcome the misleading and misunderstanding of drying in inkjet processes
    Adphos
    A successful inkjet application requires more than precisely jetting a droplet of low viscosity fluid onto a substrate. To achieve a solid layer/coated pattern an intrinsic “drying” process is a must. This so called “drying” process can have totally different physical and chemical fundamentals and can require completely different technical approaches, depending on: inkjet technology, ink type, composition, substrate, application, post-processing and other factors. Based on a brief description and explanation of the main process parameters, the major drying technologies are compared. Several real case application examples are presented to demonstrate how the chosen drying technology can strongly benefit – or limit – the resulting inkjet performance and product quality. The right drying solution can make the difference, since proper functional drying is the key!
    17:30
    The MEMS Rethink
    Fujifilm Speciality Inks
    As a consequence of combining high silicon nozzle plate specific heat capacity with the necessity of high nozzle density, to overcome expensive silicon lithography costs, many MEMS heads are unable to include an integral heater. While not a problem for intrinsically low viscosity water or solvent based inks, the resultant viscosity requirements imposed by small channel MEMS features raises significant challenges for the formulation of UV inks. Aside from the low viscosity challenge, MEMS heads are largely being targeted to industrial applications which require the inks to perform in ways that would be challenging even for established wide format graphics UV inks. In this presentation, we show that not only is there a valid role for UV inks in MEMS heads, but that the particular MEMS ink performance challenges can be met through rigorous system design, novel formulation and meticulous ink manufacturing standards.
    18:00
    Colour measurement technology
    Barbieri Electronic
    In order to achieve accurate colours with industrial printers, particular care must be taken on the measurement system. Based on the Barbieri qb coulor measurement technology we show the technology requirements and implementation hints for color measurement systems.
    18:30
    Tabletop networking
    19:30
    Best Speaker Award & Networking dinner
    21:30
    Closing Day 1
  • DAY 1 - Track 2 (05.10.2016)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    08:30
    Registration and tabletop networking
    09:20 Welcome
    09:30
    Will the next generation printheads have glass nozzles plates and what could the impact be on accuracy, reliability and printhead life
    LPKF
    Glass features a unique set of properties such as low cost, tunable surface tension and high abrasion resistance, making it a fundamentally attractive material for nozzle plates in inkjet printheads. The missing capability to economically process glass in depth on a micrometer scale with high quality is the reason why glass is not seriously considered for this application, yet. The recently developed Laser-Induced-Deep-Etching (LIDE) is now unlocking the full potential of glass for microsystems technology. This presentation will introduce LIDE technology and give an overview of its most important characteristics against the background of the targeted application. The objective of the presentation is to trigger a discussion about the potential of glass nozzle plates and to identify the necessary progress of LIDE to fully meet the requirements of this application.
    10:00
    Data-driven development of inkjet formulations using design of experiments
    ChemStream
    At ChemStream we use an integrated system approach to develop dedicated low-volume functional inkjet inks. By using a modular printing unit (MPU), smart and fast iterations can be made to the ink composition. This system integrated approach is supported by our ink development methodology based on design of experiments and statistical analysis. The use of design of experiments allows us to use a minimum of experiments to extract a maximum of data. In this presentation we will use this methodology to optimise the cure speed of an ink on our MPU. When the optimum is reached, the drop formation of the ink will be evaluated. Statistical analysis will be used to discover the optimal viscosity, voltage and waveform for jetting.
    10:30
    Know your workflow – impact of input settings on the output colour
    ColorGATE
    Today most people working within the printing industry are aware of how critical the colour output is for them and their customers. They take care of creating dedicated output profiles for their workflows and take care of maintaining the process. Still the output may differ from the intended result – because it is at least as important to take care of the input side of the workflow, especially in digital printing processes. Knowing the input data and the right workflow settings is the key for accuracy. A customer PDF can contain a multitude of settings and embedded parameters – and a single misconfigured setting in a RIP can result in a disaster as the output of any file can be easily changed massively with just a couple of clicks. Input profiles, colour modes, rendering intents and colour corrections can make the difference. Printing for multiple purposes or reacting to customer requirements does not require multiple profiles. If the goal is colour-accurate printing or achieving the most vibrancy for popping colours, it is mostly a setting in the data processing path which determines if you are utilising the complete output colour space or just a defined part of it. Being aware of all workflow steps is the key to achieving and exceeding customer requirements.
    11:00
    Networking coffee break
    11:30
    Upcoming trends in digital technologies for textile
    TexZeppelin
    Inkjet technology and the printing flexibility it offers is enabling a rapid growth in industrial and commercial inkjet printing of many textile substrates (read: casual, fashion and sport clothing, deco material, indoor and outdoor textile). And not to forget technical textile such as protective textile, including clothing, or architectural textile. The evolution of the industrial digital high speed printing equipment requires permanent innovative solutions of the printheads, inks and software to enable the final integration and evolution of the printing machine. Moreover many developments on the level of peripheral apparatus are the drivers for this fast adoption. UV curable inks, waterborne pigment, vat inks and inline colour kitchen are some examples of recent developments. Inkjet technologies offer more opportunities than just printing. Digital printing has evolved into a major market – digital micro-deposition of functional inks is a logical next step. Why digital coating? One can cite efficient use of resources, linking functionality (such as oleophobicity/hydrophobicity, antistatic, security inks, chromic sensors) and creativity, pattern deposition of topochemical functionalities on demand, possibility of digital printing and conventional coating on same line, use of printheads on commercial coating machines, less inventory needs (print/coat on demand), no set-up costs, and minimal waste, among others. Digital has the potential to revolutionise the business models of the coating industry.
    12:00
    Benefits of using pigment inks for textile printing: commercial, environmental and economical
    Velvet Jet
    The textile industry is one of the largest printing industries in the world with hundreds of types of textiles for many uses and applications. Yet, in spite of the accelerated adaptation of digital printing for other printing applications, most of the textile printing is still done in analogue methods. The difficulty in adaptation of digital printing for textile lies in the type of inks currently in use: dye inks, in which each type of dye is adequate for use for a small amount of different types of fabrics. The way to overcome this barrier lays in a new ink type, which would allow printing on any type of fabric with equal quality. The pigment ink for textile appears to be the right solution to this barrier, as it is able to adhere to all types of fibres with equal results, enabling the use of one printer and one type of pre-treatment, thus simplifying the entire process and allowing one print shop to service multiple types of customers. The simple process of pigment textile printing requires no post-treatment, washing or steaming, thus significantly reducing electricity consumption and eliminating water consumption altogether. In addition, it is significantly lower in human labour, and matches the dye-based printing in total print cost.
    12:30
    Fastness and Disperse Printing
    Huntsman
    In this presentation we are going to discuss some of the properties of disperse inks and highlight the differences between them. We will introduce some of the test methods used to determine the fastness and discuss what is required depending on the application used. Also we are going to give some information regarding printing on polyamide and introduce some concepts and backgrounds regarding the process required.
    13:00
    Networking lunch
    14:30
    Nano-pigment dispersions for industrial inkjet systems
    RJA Dispersions
    Applications for nano-dispersions are expanding dramatically with the growth of high speed in-line inkjet printers. The industry that began with wide format inkjet for commercial advertising with display graphics printed on vinyl films, banners, textiles, has found the technology applicable to in-line label printing, direct printing on packaging containers and retail multidimensional objects. Concepts like patterned adhesives, spectrally selective window films, flexible electronics, and others have changed the position of inkjet from a “printing technology” to a “precision coating technology”. This paper will review dispersion technology needed to produce the high reliability, highly transparent, highly stable functional materials for these new industrial applications. It will address what developers need to know, how to evaluate and use dispersions to create inkjet-able materials, which will meet their objectives of stability, viscosity, flexibility, transparency, and filterability. The talk will specifically address choices for aqueous, solvent, or UV curable systems including: choices of monomers for ink properties. Choices of pigments for durability, transparency, colour space, and evaluation of dispersions for stability, viscosity, and filterability.
    15:00
    Understanding particle size requirements and limitations for inkjet printing in different industry sectors
    Netzsch/Malvern Instruments
    Inkjet is becoming an increasingly important commercial and manufacturing tool with current applications including textile, packaging, ceramic decoration, printed electronics and additive manufacturing. For such applications, the deposited material is often in the form of a particulate suspension where particle size and shape can be critical for end use requirements such as gloss or opacity in decorative coatings. In some applications a larger particle size may be beneficial from an end use perspective but the size that can be used in practice is often limited by the density of the particulate component and the viscosity of the continuous phase. In other applications very fine particles may be needed, but if too fine, the colour strength and other important properties might be lost. Therefore a controlled and well defined particle size distribution is key to meeting the specifications and quality parameters for different inkjet dispersions. In this presentation we will discuss the particle size distribution and viscosity requirements for inkjet dispersions across different industries and applications, and during the different steps of the manufacturing process, and how they can be optimised to give the requisite stability and end use performance.
    15:30
    An analysis of different ink recirculation architectures and their benefits
    Xaar
    Since Xaar launched the revolutionary Xaar 1001 printhead with TF Technology® in 2007, recirculation of fluid within printheads has been widely acknowledged to be essential by a number of printhead manufacturers who modified their printhead offerings to include a fluid recirculation capability. This presentation refreshes the general concept of fluid recirculation and the significant benefits it can deliver. It also looks in more detail at the different architectures in the market and compares the features they offer. In addition the further benefits of TF Technology® for improved nozzle latency and operating window are presented.
    16:00
    Networking coffee break
    16:30
    Software is as important a component as any hardware
    Global Graphics Software
    Intelligent software is as critical a component of your inkjet press as the printhead, media, ink, fluid control, paper movement, or electronics. It has the power to resolve problems that cannot be resolved cost-effectively in hardware. It can also differentiate your press in the market and bring unique value to your users. So why do some press vendors spend so little time upfront thinking about it? We explore some of the issues involved and lay out what you need to know when your press is still on the drawing board.
    17:00
    Process monitoring of single pass printing by wide format image inspection
    Baumer Inspection
    Baumer Inspection has developed an innovative inspection system for digital printing. This scanner detects all flaws during the single pass printing process, gives alarms in case of drifts and prevents production of rejects by permanently analysing the quality of printing. The Baumer scanner is designed to be installed in lines for decor printing and in lines for packaging printing, at lines with up to 150 m/min printing speed at up to 720 dpi. The automatic inspection will need no referencing to RIP files data, will monitor colour consistency and grade the visibility of defects detected. To achieve the target of being independent from RIP information, the system has a design which gives a perfect contrast for all flaws, independent of any decor. A wide format ColourBrain®DoD scanner, with a field of inspection of 2,250 mm, will be installed in a production line in Germany, with an array of fast line scan cameras and integrated FPGA for real time image pre-processing.
    17:30
    The wide operating range printhead RC1536
    Seiko Instruments
    Since our last presentation on The Inkjet Conference 2015, we started mass-production of our new re-circulation inkjet printhead RC1536 and we did many kinds of jetting tests based on demands from various markets. In our last presentation, we talked about the possibilities of RC1536 specifications and technologies. This time, we would like to show more realistic results that we have tested so far, and make the information public. We will provide real tests figures about the wide operation range of our RC1536 printhead.
    18:00
    Precise UV LED Irradiance control for improved process stability and repeatability
    Phoseon
    The technical and economic advantages of UV LED sources for digital printing are well understood. As demands for better process control increase, LED UV sources now offer a much higher degree of constant regulated emission, addressing the unwanted effects from environmental and operational variables. When LED sources are initially switched on, this instant-on phase typically overshoots the target irradiance by up to 20%, and takes 3-5 minutes or more of operating time before it settles to the target output. This time commonly is referred to as time to equilibrium. Another challenge is ambient air temperature variation. Air-cooled systems use fans to move air across a heat-sink to cool the LED assemblies. As the ambient temperature increases, the diodes produce lower irradiance due to lower efficiency. The third challenge is aging. LEDs slowly lose efficiency over a long period of time, typical operating times being anywhere from 20,000 to 50,000 hours of on time. However, the output of LEDs will not stay consistent over the entire lifetime and irradiance will slowly degrade by 10 – 20%. TargetCure™ technology addresses these challenges, providing a UV LED light source that removes these variables from the print process, providing repeatable and stable irradiance.
    18:30
    Tabletop networking
    19:30
    Best Speaker Award & Networking dinner
    21:30
    Closing Day 1
  • DAY 2 - Track 1 (06.10.2016)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    08:30
    Registration and tabletop networking
    08:55 Welcome
    09:00
    10 things you should know about patents
    Extract Information
    Love them or hate them, patents and the information disclosed and claimed within them play an important role in the business that is the inkjet printing industry. Filing a patent, and getting it granted can provide you protection for your technology, and could prevent a competitor treading in your patch. In turn, a competitor’s patent(s) could be a concern for your business. Understanding how to use patent information to your advantage throughout the technology development life cycle will be the focus of this talk.
    09:30
    ‘JetBar’ – An integrated module for printhead alignment and nozzle inspection
    NTS Group
    Today industrial inkjet printers suffers from two important challenges, the first is print heads calibration which is tedious and labour intensive process that needs to be performed during installation, maintenance etc. The second is to detect failing nozzles to ensure minimum print quality. Both challenges become dominant especially for large number of printheads. To overcome the challenges, we launched an integrated and standalone module ‘JetBar’ which can be easily integrated in the machine to calibrate the printheads and detect failing nozzles using droplet recognition techniques and printing test patterns on a glass plate instead of the ‘actual’ substrate.
    10:00
    Does the advent of high performance printheads mean more headaches for integrators and end users?
    Xaar
    The last few years have seen the launch of many new printheads into the industrial inkjet market with ever increasing levels of performance and higher and higher numbers of dots per inch. These printheads have extended the penetration of inkjet into existing markets and opened up some new applications. But does this mean that these printheads are more difficult and expensive to integrate into printers? What benefits can they pass on to the end user? Jason Remnant, Xaar’s Thin Film Product Manager will answer some of these questions by exploring publicly for the first time some elements of Xaar’s recently announced Xaar 5601 printhead.
    10:30
    Networking coffee break
    11:00
    Kodak Ultrastream Technology expands production inkjet into new applications
    Kodak
    ULTRASTREAM Technology is the 4th generation of Kodak’s continuous inkjet (CIJ) technology using a new drop deflection methodology. With higher resolution, smaller drop size, expanded substrate range and lower production and capital cost, ULTRASTREAM can move digital printing into higher volume mainstream applications including packaging, commercial printing, décor, publication, and industrial printing. Kodak will explain how ULTRASTREAM achieves industry leading drop placement accuracy, drop uniformity, image quality, colour gamut, and substrate independence, leveraging know-how in nano-particulate pigment ink and material science. With ULTRASTREAM’s ability to print at a drop generation frequency of 400KHz, this newest advancement in CIJ productivity, image quality, running and capital cost will truly rival offset.
    11:30
    Diaphragm pumps – the excellent choice for inkjet printers
    KNF
    Inkjet printer manufacturers are constantly seeking to increase printing speed and quality, while at the same time reducing cost per square meter. Here KNF diaphragm pumps fully live up to their strengths, helping deliver ink at the right time to the right place in the right quality – and this in a very reliable way over a long period of time. In his presentation Andreas Hauri gives insight into KNF diaphragm pump technology and explains the reasons why they are the preferred choice for many of the industries’ leaders and why they can also be the ideal solution for your ink delivery system.
    12:00
    Ink delivery systems – design options and troubleshooting
    Global Inkjet Systems
    This presentation will look at key criteria such as tubing, pressure control, flow type, different IDS designs, pitfalls and troubleshooting common issues.
    12:30
    Networking lunch
    13:30
    Inkjet inks for industrial applications
    Agfa
    Industrial printing is adopting inkjet because of its digital advantages and response to consumer demands. The printing step is one step of the full manufacturing process, requiring the ink formulations not only to be tuned for the printing set-up, but the ink also needs to be part of a full solution approach. Specific examples of industrial applications will be discussed, mainly from an ink perspective.
    14:00
    Newly developed UV-curable inkjet technology for digital inkjet press “Accurio Jet KM-1”
    Konica Minolta
    We have developed a unique UV-curable inkjet technology for a sheet-fed off-set like inkjet printer “Accurio Jet KM-1”, which will bring a new wave of digitalisation into the commercial printing world. There were many technical challenges to realise both high speed and high quality recording process in the system. We explored the technical fields for that purpose and finally developed a variety of technologies. In particular, we developed a new ink and a new printhead as the key components of the system. Combined these new technologies, we have succeeded to develop the system, “Accurio Jet KM-1”, for digital printing world.
    14:30
    The Digital Front End
    TTP Meteor
    The Digital Front End (DFE) is the name given to the software that resides on the printer to control the data path and mechanisms but which typically does not include the RIP or screening. There are no specialist companies providing just DFEs but nearly all inkjet printers have some form of DFE and all developers must create a DFE for their inkjet printer if they cannot convince either their RIP software partner or their data path electronics partner to develop it for them. We have been recently developing DFE for various industries and are willing to share some of the issues we discovered and their solutions.
    15:00
    Networking coffee break
    15:30
    Printhead controller boards for inkjet printheads and their role in the printing process
    DPS Innovations
    Printhead and ink manufacturers know well how to make their products. There is a long list of factors that have an influence on the printing process. Specially designed controller boards that drive printheads also have an influence on the final printed image. Printhead controller boards are not only responsible for individual drop formation, but also for controlling other processes that affect the quality of printing. For various types of printheads it is necessary to design and manufacture a controller board which will provide control signals to the printhead according to specific printhead’s technical characteristics. The challenge is to make a solution that is stable and at a reasonable cost. Banding effects during multi-pass printing; electrical noise resistance while transferring large batches of data – these are some of the factors to be considered during controller boards’ development.
    16:00
    Advancements in technologies for controlling pigment size and further properties
    Microtrac
    The demands on the characterisation of inks regarding their pigment size, single oversized grains and colloidal stability are increasing. The size of pigments has an impact on factors like printability, printhead blockages, sharpness of texture, optical density and colour gamut. Laser diffraction is the most popular method of particle size analysis for the milling process, allowing close control and optimisation of a number of product performance criteria. Laser diffraction can now be combined with integrated Image Analysis to detect single oversized particles or clumps which cause a risk for blockages. A second technique, Dynamic light scattering (DLS), can be used to measure the size of nano-pigments and dyes, and to assess the risk of formation of aggregates by Zeta Potential analysis. The next generation of DLS is the Heterodyne Reference Beating technology, which uses frequency shifts instead of autocorrelation functions. Benefits of this technology are the measurement in final product concentration and external probes for direct in-situ measurement.
    16:30
    Future trends in inkjet paper: Waterbased inkjet mainstream in every market segment
    Crown Van Gelder
    Paper is a vital element in successful waterbased inkjet printing. Paper with the right properties contributes to optimising Total Cost of Ownership and it helps to increase ROI. Inkjet paper is not only an information carrier, it enables ink saving, it optimises runnability in both printing and finishing line, it offers the right visual and tactile experience and it helps to meet or exceed customers expectation. Every market segment has its own requirements. The transactional and direct mail market, the publishing market and more recently label and packaging market segments have their own key parameters for success. This presentation shows how paper becomes a key element in reaching business objectives.
    17:00
    Increasing drop watching efficiency
    iPrint Institute
    Drop watching is a key technology to find suitable operating parameters of inkjet printheads. With a drop watching system, usually a large number of droplets has to be jetted for each configuration of the printing system. As inkjet is increasingly being utilised in functional printing, an increasing number of fluids with a limited stability and potentially very high material cost are jetted. For such applications there is a need for an increased efficiency of the drop watching process. The amount of wasted fluid has to be reduced and the process of finding operational parameters has to be faster. One possibility to achieve these goals is reducing the number of jetted drops per analysis and rapidly changing waveform parameters. By minimising the number of drops per analysed configuration and increasing the frequency in which different waveforms are tested, engaging effects of the printhead and interference with the previously tested waveform are reducing the accuracy of the analysis. In this publication the potential of increasing the efficiency of drop watching by reduction of jetted droplets and faster waveform testing is explored.
    17:30
    Best Speaker Award & Tabletop networking
    18:00
    Closing Day 2
  • DAY 2 - Track 2 (06.10.2016)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    08:30
    Registration and tabletop networking
    08:55 Welcome
    09:00
    Inkjet market developments in print and packaging
    Smithers Pira
    In the wake of a raft of announcements and introductions at drupa showing inkjet is as productive as litho and flexo the adoption of inkjet in commercial and publishing print is continuing to grow. In packaging and labels the potential for major disruption by inkjet is enormous. Smithers Pira will share our market data and forecasts on how inkjet is continuing to shape the future of print and printed packaging with better quality, productivity and economics, making inkjet – in all its various technical iterations – more competitive.
    09:30
    Impact of a substrate's surface free energy on adhesion and polymerisation of UV DOD inks
    Hapa
    The impact of a substrate’s surface tension on ink adhesion and flowing behaviour is known in the printing industry. As important to know is the impact of a substrate’s surface tension on the polymerization of UV DOD inks. Consideration of surface treatment, print process controlling and measurement help to understand the impact of surface free energy on the adhesion and polymerisation of UV DOD inks. Hapa supports this process with sophisticated UV inks and the methods of measuring and qualifying adhesion and polymerisation.
    10:00
    Ink-substrate-process-interaction: the holistic approach for industrial projects
    Marabu
    Digital printing gains importance within industrial processes. At the same time, demands on machines, processes, and inks compared to traditional graphic printing are also rising. For most industrial areas digital printing or even printing processes in general are completely new; companies are seeking for cooperation partners. Machine manufacturers, process integrators, and often ink manufacturers are involved, but when working independently of each other, development time can be very long and the results might not meet the customer’s expectations. The development process is not to be regarded as isolated, partial steps. As there is a very strong connection between ink, substrate, and process it is of high importance to coordinate communication at an early stage. Especially for industrial projects it is utterly important to pursue a holistic approach. This presentation will show the significance of parameter and effect interdependencies such as surface tension and wetting behaviour. Real life examples underlining their significance for the overall development process are a core component of the presentation.
    10:30
    Networking coffee break
    11:00
    What makes a successful aqueous ink: Some of the benefits and challenges of digital printing for industrial inkjet applications
    Fujifilm Imaging Colorants
    The conversion rate from analogue to digital printing is indicative of the need to overcome the balance of benefits vs. challenges of digital printing for major industrial markets, namely commercial, textile, packaging and decorative printing. While most of the benefits can be common between different industries, the challenges are usually market specific. Understanding these challenges and the post and pre-print process steps is key to developing a successful print solution. A review of the benefits and challenges of digital printing is given along with recent technological advances including Fujifilm Inkjet Technology.
    11:30
    Crossflow Filtration for inkjet ink fluids and the toolbox for inkjet ink formulation
    Pall
    Following the increasing number of challenges for ink and colorant manufacturers to meet the need for improved pigment dispersions and more complex chemistries – move toward greener practices – and the pressure to improve economics, Pall is offering a number of different crossflow technologies for a variety of applications in diverse industries. Pall has developed expertise in crossflow products and special supporting system design for ink applications as well as a toolbox for filterability testing, cleanliness test and degassing of ink.
    12:00
    Collaboration of new screen print and Digiace inkjet print
    Matsui
    Currently, to print on a coloured fabric by inkjet printing, it requires inkjet white ink, and it also requires pre-treatment to prevent the ink from sinking, so it is not suitable for large production lots. The collaboration system of screen print and Digiace inkjet print that we are introducing at TheIJC will have advantages from both sides. The printing method: White opaque layer is screen-printed on a coloured fabric and inkjet colour is printed over the opaque layer. It does not require many screens or limit the expression of gradation design. Also, pre-treatment onto the fabric is not required, and it will save time of printing the opaque layer. Furthermore, it was not possible to inkjet-print on polyester fabrics due to migration before, but it can be printed on polyester with this system by putting a sublimation blocker binder underneath.
    12:30
    Networking lunch
    13:30
    Particle Size and Stability measurement in Ink
    Particle Metrix
    Printings have involved the use of colour or black materials contained in various vehicles since the time of cavemen. Modern inks contain many components each having a specific purpose in maintaining colour, intensity, dispersion, viscosity, as well as acting as a milling aid. NANO-flex® in combination with the brand new IPAS system provides an exceptional avenue to provide Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data now also inline in moved liquids for process control. This allows for example a much better milling efficiency. Use of the Power Spectrum analysis provides high repeatability and advanced analysis while the probe technology permits measurement at high particle concentrations. Stabino® a Zetapotential measurement and titration system allows measuring Zetapotential in undiluted ink. It is also possible to use the titration unit of the Stabino® to find an optimum of used surfactants. The Stabino® can be used in a combination with the NANO-flex® to find out the co-agglomeration point. Another option to use the Stabino® is for quick stability measurement of inks.
    14:00
    Optimising print process factors for Aquacure™ inks
    Sun Chemical
    With Sun Chemical’s recent development of aqueous hybrid UV inks within the inkjet space, the possibility to extend functional aqueous inkjet inks into packaging, graphics and industrial markets is now reality. Sun Chemical has developed its Aquacure™ technology as a platform that can be customised into multiple-pass and single-pass applications. We will describe some of the challenges faced in optimising the ink properties for the combination of print head performance and end-use functionality. The likely implications to print process design and optimisation will be discussed.
    14:30
    Organic colorants for digital printing: Introduction and recent trends
    Clariant
    The colours of digital images are provided predominately by organic colorants. Organic colorants can be either pigments or dyes. Thirty years ago inkjet inks were dye-based while today a strong trend to pigments due to cost and performance occurred. In a typical inkjet ink, the concentration of the colorants is rather small: 3-5 % but finally these minor components determine the quality performance of the image. The presentation will describe the differences between dyes and pigments, strengths and weaknesses, key quality features of colorants and selection criteria which are used to identify the right products out of thousands of available colorants in the market. The presentation will also include 2-3 slides concerning our company as well as the global market for dyes and pigments and the different application areas for colorants in general.
    15:00
    Networking coffee break
    15:30
    Practical issues in the design of single pass industrial inkjet printers
    Inca Digital
    Large-scale industrial single pass printers are difficult and expensive to develop. There are considerable technical challenges in providing printheads with ink and data, and in making a reliable and serviceable system. An even greater challenge is the development of the single pass print process: the combination of ink, substrate and drying which delivers the required print quality. This presentation discusses some of the issues and proposes a development route from commercial feasibility, through process development to final machine.
    16:00
    7-Colour eXpanded gamut (XG) reproduction using CMYK+RGB colorants
    STS Inks/Opaltone
    The CMYK process was invented in the late 19th century. Over 140 years later, CMYK remains the industry standard for the digital reproduction of colour in print. It is well documented that the CMYK gamut is restricted, hence the need to complement the process using clean, bright spot colours that fall outside the CMYK gamut. In digital printing, it is not viable or cost-effective to print spot colours. They must be digitally simulated in CMYK, often leaving the print buyer disappointed with the outcome. The new approach is to complement CMYK with extra-trinary colorants. For example, CMYK+RGB. This presentation covers the latest developments in XG colour for inkjet including: colorant, density and TVI standards, 7-colour separation software and profiling.
    16:30
    Sinter-free hybrid metal-polymer inks for printed and flexible electronics
    Leibniz Institute for New Materials
    Conductive inks are the basis of future printed electronics. At INM, we perform research on colloids and interfaces and exploit our results to create advanced inks with designed fluid properties, drying behaviour, and material characteristics. Our organic‐inorganic hybrid inks combine metal nanoparticles with conductive polymers. The inks directly form conductive paths after deposition without the need for sintering. Conductive polymers bridge the gaps between the inorganic cores and stabilize the inks for sufficient shelf life. I will discuss the challenges of nanoparticle synthesis and surface modification that have to be overcome to create such inks and the opportunities for inkjet printing of electronic devices that these inks bring. Future inks will self‐organise during printing to further improve nanoparticle packaging and material properties; I will highlight recent results on such materials.
    17:00
    Synthesis of particles inks for inkjet printing of microelectronic components
    Fraunhofer IKTS
    IKTS will present the synthesis, formulation and inkjet printing of nanoparticle inks based on Ag, Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Cu. Important ink specifications for the inkjet printing process like particle size, viscosity, surface tension, sedimentation stability as well as electronic conductivities and adhesion of printed films on low temperature substrates for printed electronics will be discussed. Furthermore, inkjet-printed sensor components for high temperature application will be shown. A new and potentially disruptive millisecond functionalisation technique, based on a R2R scalable diode laser line system, to cure inkjet-printed films on thermal sensitive substrates like polymer or paper, will be presented.
    17:30
    Best Speaker Award & Tabletop networking
    18:00
    Closing Day 2
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Next InkJet Conference

TheIJC 2017
24-25 October 2017
Düsseldorf/Neuss, Germany

About Us

TheIJC is an ESMA event - ESMA is a leading non-profit European association for printing manufacturers in screen, digital and flexo technology.

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For general information about TheIJC, including EXHIBITOR information, please contact us at:
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