About Event | Registration | News | 2017-10-24 09:00:00 2017-10-25 18:00:00 Europe/London theIJC.com Annual InkJet Conference 2017 Dusseldorf Germany ESMA info@esma.com

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TheIJC.com - 4th Annual InkJet Conference - Dusseldorf, 24 - 25 October 2017. The place to be for Inkjet Engineering and Inkjet Chemistry    Tickets Now Available

Programme

printheadlogostheijc2017

  • DAY 1 - Track 1 (24.10.2017)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    09:00
    WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    Expanding the boundaries with continuous inkjet
    Plenary session
    Kodak
    Vision to Reality over 50 years… Since 1967, Kodak has developed a unique variety of inkjet called Continuous Inkjet which has revolutionised the digital printing world. CIJ, with its speed and reliability was the first to bring true hybrid digital/offset printing into the mainstream. Now, 50 years later, Kodak digital presses and components, monochrome and colour, have been installed around the world in a variety of commercial, publishing, newspaper and packaging applications. Kodak CIJ is unprecedented in its speed, image quality and running cost. With a droplet generator of over 400KHz, Kodak is printing with single print arrays with Stream Inkjet Technology at speeds beyond 300 mpm and with the best production inkjet image quality, with round and uniform drops and high degree of drop placement accuracy. Due to Kodak’s nano-particulate pigment inks combined with continuous flow of ink through the nozzles, Kodak’s inks are easier to dry and can print on glossy substrates and even films and plastics with water-based inks. Now with Kodak ULTRASTREAM Inkjet Technology, customers in packaging, home décor, and industrial markets can also migrate the mainstream of their work from analogue to digital. As Kodak celebrates 50 years in the industry and the expansion of technology into the future.
    09:45
    Advanced bulk piezo ceramics technology for high performance industrial inkjet printhead
    Plenary session
    Kyocera
    Most of industrial inkjet printheads are driven with piezoelectric actuator made by sintering bulk of material composition over 1000 C° or forming thin film by material deposition or sol-gel method over 600 C°. In case of bulk piezo ceramics, grain boundaries are bonded firmly through high temperature process to complete chemical reaction even in microscopic level although it requires special technology to build it into micro mechanical systems. On the other hand, thin film piezo can be applied for fine patterning but have more chance of ion migration or friction among grains due to looser grain boundary by relatively lower process temperature. Kyocera chose the bulk piezo technology as a power source of the industrial inkjet printhead due to its essential reliability, and has been optimizing the formulation as well as processes to realize high performance. Background stories of proven technology in the market are to be introduced.
    10:15
    Advances in nozzle architecture design, driven by Silicon MEMS capabilities and freedoms, to deliver next generation inkjet printheads
    Plenary session
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    Leveraging over 30 years of printhead design, Fujifilm Dimatix continue to push the boundaries of what can be done with the technology and processes to enable piezo inkjet technology to leap forward in capabilities and performance to address the ever increased demands from the market.
    Leading the evolution of Silicon MEMS printhead development, at their in-house wafer-fab facility in Santa Clara, California, over the last 10 years Fujifilm Dimatix has delivered meaningful innovation in the technology with:
    - Sputtered PZT; to deliver exceptional nozzle life and performance stability over time
    - Nozzle level Ink recirculation; leading to increased reliability and sustainability
    - Structurally hard and robust nozzle plates; for increased resilience from head strikes
    - Durable non-wetting nozzle plate coatings; for exceptional drop ejection behavior and improved sustainability
    - Robust, chemically inert material sets; eliminating adhesive layers within the nozzle plate structure to produce a highly stable, uniform and robust monolithic structure.
    Fujifilm Dimatix will use this presentation to outline how, with the development of proprietary modeling tools and utilizing the flexibility of the MEMS manufacturing processes, has enabled Dimatix to evolve their designs to manufacture highly desirable nozzle geometries, delivering higher jet speeds, flatter frequency responses and more stable long life performance.
    10:45
    Thermal inkjet printhead technology for industrial print
    Plenary session
    HP
    Thermal inkjet has been a staple of consumer and office printing for three decades. HP is using its scalable printhead technology to grow into industrial applications. This talk will review some basics of thermal inkjet and discuss the variety of HP system designs used across several large and small industrial markets. It will conclude by describing the key technical factors contributing to HP thermal inkjet’s success in industrial packaging applications.
    11:15
    COFFEE BREAK
    11:45
    Achieving industrial reliability with inkjet printing
    Inca Digital
    As inkjet printing moves into industrial manufacturing applications, reliability becomes paramount: a printer failure can immediately stop production. It is therefore important to consider at an early stage of design what factors may compromise the reliability of a printer. Once this has been done, mitigating measures can be incorporated into the design. Inkjet printers are complex systems containing many parts which are essential for the correct running of the printer. It is important to use high quality components and to put into place a scheduled maintenance regime for those components prone to wear. One of the biggest threats to a machine’s reliability is human error. It is not possible to eliminate this, but by automating routine operations, the exposure to human error can be reduced. This talk summarises some of the lessons learned at Inca Digital Printers over 17 years of developing inkjet printers for industrial applications and illustrates this with some examples.
    12:15
    Inkjet for high speed wallpaper applications
    Industrial Inkjet
    The European wallpaper market has been contracting slowly since 2006. Recent developments in the single-pass digital printing have opened up new opportunities for interior designs to add colour to revitalise interior space. IIJ see a real opportunity for inkjet in the wallpaper market to reverse this trend. This presentation covers an overview of the current market, challenges, requirements and future of digital printing for wallpaper applications.
    12:45
    How to integrate UV LED curing units in printing machines for perfect polymerisation
    Hapa
    The today’s integration of a UV LED curing unit into printing machines is more like a trial and error procedure than a scientific work. The knowledge of the optical characteristic related to UV power and illumination time to the substrate are important for the design. Hapa shows and supports engineering methods for perfect designs of UV LED units for their UV curing inks. This process is important to realize low migration applications and also adhesion on different substrates.
    13:15
    LUNCH
    14:30
    Pigments for inkjet food packaging printing
    BASF
    With inkjet printing showing strong and steady growth in packaging and industrial printing, there are rising concerns over the suitability and compliance of inkjet inks for sensitive applications such as food packaging, where the inks – and thereby the primary ink components like pigments, resins and additives – need to meet stringent requirements in terms of their toxicological profile and migration behaviour. This paper will review pigments for inkjet food packaging printing, in the light of the latest changes in legislations and recommendations by the competent EU national and Community authorities. A selection of suitable organic pigments for inkjet inks for food packaging printing will be presented.
    15:00
    Digitising the printing process for flooring, furnishing and other functional and industrial applications
    Sensient
    Digital printing technologies are growing exponentially from mature markets such as graphic arts to strong growth areas including textiles and labels. On the back of these success stories, there is a further revolution, with digital printing being adopted as a manufacturing tool, not simply to add design or colour but as a key part in a process to get to a product. Such processes may involve deposition of functional or performance material onto a substrate within a production process. Adoption of digital printing is leading to increased efficiency, reduced waste and often more environmentally-friendly considered products. In the presentation we will discuss a few areas where digital technology is expected to play a growing role.
    15:30
    Ink receptive technologies: The bedrock for consistent durability in industrial inkjet systems
    Lubrizol
    The ink receptive layer can play a vital role in the achievement of premium aesthetics and durability in industrial inkjet systems. This presentation will explore case studies in industrial label and textile applications where durability and total cost was key to end user adoption. Test methodology will be explored as a function to ensure consistent durability. Audience participation is encouraged.
    16:00
    COFFEE BREAK
    16:30
    Inkjet inks for packaging: Opportunities and challenges
    Evonik
    With the progress in inkjet hardware development, the use of inkjet for packaging applications is becoming highly attractive. This presentation will reflect on the opportunities inkjet is bringing to the production of packaging and how it can help to meet current market needs. Additionally, it will illustrate some key challenges for inkjet inks in packaging applications and possible ways to overcome those challenges using high performance specialty additives.
    17:00
    Instantaneous and low thermal stress inkjet post-processing
    Adphos
    A large variety of inkjet applications, especially according to component geometries, substrate materials and coating types are justifying the attractive market potential of the non-contacting inkjet-technology. But today most limitations result from the necessary post-processing – the drying step – of the liquid jetted coating pattern. In this presentation, it is outlined, how an instantaneous and low thermal stress drying technology – the adphosNIR® systems technology – can overcome the limitations. Based on real case application examples, special working principles of the adphosNIR®-technology are demonstrated, as well as its unique benefits in textile, plastics, cardboards, biomaterials, printed electronics and now also in direct print-to-shape inkjet applications in comparison with conventional drying solutions.
    17:30
    Size, stability and rheological analysis of dispersed particles
    Anton Paar
    Printing inks are made of pigments or dyes that give the ink its colour. Pigments are insoluble, articulate colorants whose particle size is usually in the micron range, and have either an organic or inorganic origin. Dyes, in contrast, are very small molecules (particle size < 1 nm) which are usually soluble in their medium. The measurement of pigment particle size is an excellent predictor of the final product’s performance. In fact, it is often assumed that problems like poor colour strength and shade derive from poor raw material quality; instead they are rather due to the particle size distribution. Properties like flocculation, tint strength, transparency, viscosity and stability are dependent on particle size and can be optimized in order to deliver the required product to the end user. We present latest technologies of in-situ particle analysis in dry or wet dispersions, and shed light on the importance of viscosity effects of the latter ones. Additionally, there will be a focus on rheological description, which are the yield point, flow properties and thixotropy.
    18:00
    Contact image sensors (CIS) for digital print (sheet, r2r, direct-to-shape)
    Tichawa Vision
    The presentation explains the different inspection requirements for digital print in sheet, roll-to-roll and direct-to-shape applications, as well as differences between conventional open-loop CIS sensors versus Tichawa Vision's closed-loop CIS Sensors. We will conclude with the combination of CIS technology with FPGA-based data processing resulting in dramatically reduced software overhead and new functionality such as nozzle defect detection in hardware.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
    22:00
    CLOSING DAY 1
  • DAY 1 - Track 2 (24.10.2017)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    09:00
    WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    Expanding the boundaries with continuous inkjet
    Plenary session
    Kodak
    Vision to Reality over 50 years… Since 1967, Kodak has developed a unique variety of inkjet called Continuous Inkjet which has revolutionised the digital printing world. CIJ, with its speed and reliability was the first to bring true hybrid digital/offset printing into the mainstream. Now, 50 years later, Kodak digital presses and components, monochrome and colour, have been installed around the world in a variety of commercial, publishing, newspaper and packaging applications. Kodak CIJ is unprecedented in its speed, image quality and running cost. With a droplet generator of over 400KHz, Kodak is printing with single print arrays with Stream Inkjet Technology at speeds beyond 300 mpm and with the best production inkjet image quality, with round and uniform drops and high degree of drop placement accuracy. Due to Kodak’s nano-particulate pigment inks combined with continuous flow of ink through the nozzles, Kodak’s inks are easier to dry and can print on glossy substrates and even films and plastics with water-based inks. Now with Kodak ULTRASTREAM Inkjet Technology, customers in packaging, home décor, and industrial markets can also migrate the mainstream of their work from analogue to digital. As Kodak celebrates 50 years in the industry and the expansion of technology into the future.
    09:45
    Advanced bulk piezo ceramics technology for high performance industrial inkjet printhead
    Plenary session
    Kyocera
    Most of industrial inkjet printheads are driven with piezoelectric actuator made by sintering bulk of material composition over 1000 C° or forming thin film by material deposition or sol-gel method over 600 C°. In case of bulk piezo ceramics, grain boundaries are bonded firmly through high temperature process to complete chemical reaction even in microscopic level although it requires special technology to build it into micro mechanical systems. On the other hand, thin film piezo can be applied for fine patterning but have more chance of ion migration or friction among grains due to looser grain boundary by relatively lower process temperature. Kyocera chose the bulk piezo technology as a power source of the industrial inkjet printhead due to its essential reliability, and has been optimizing the formulation as well as processes to realize high performance. Background stories of proven technology in the market are to be introduced.
    10:15
    Advances in nozzle architecture design, driven by Silicon MEMS capabilities and freedoms, to deliver next generation inkjet printheads
    Plenary session
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    Leveraging over 30 years of printhead design, Fujifilm Dimatix continue to push the boundaries of what can be done with the technology and processes to enable piezo inkjet technology to leap forward in capabilities and performance to address the ever increased demands from the market.
    Leading the evolution of Silicon MEMS printhead development, at their in-house wafer-fab facility in Santa Clara, California, over the last 10 years Fujifilm Dimatix has delivered meaningful innovation in the technology with:
    - Sputtered PZT; to deliver exceptional nozzle life and performance stability over time
    - Nozzle level Ink recirculation; leading to increased reliability and sustainability
    - Structurally hard and robust nozzle plates; for increased resilience from head strikes
    - Durable non-wetting nozzle plate coatings; for exceptional drop ejection behavior and improved sustainability
    - Robust, chemically inert material sets; eliminating adhesive layers within the nozzle plate structure to produce a highly stable, uniform and robust monolithic structure.
    Fujifilm Dimatix will use this presentation to outline how, with the development of proprietary modeling tools and utilizing the flexibility of the MEMS manufacturing processes, has enabled Dimatix to evolve their designs to manufacture highly desirable nozzle geometries, delivering higher jet speeds, flatter frequency responses and more stable long life performance.
    10:45
    Thermal inkjet printhead technology for industrial print
    Plenary session
    HP
    Thermal inkjet has been a staple of consumer and office printing for three decades. HP is using its scalable printhead technology to grow into industrial applications. This talk will review some basics of thermal inkjet and discuss the variety of HP system designs used across several large and small industrial markets. It will conclude by describing the key technical factors contributing to HP thermal inkjet’s success in industrial packaging applications.
    11:15
    COFFEE BREAK
    11:45
    Drivers and requirements for next generation digital textile inks
    Fujifilm Imaging Colorants
    A review of (CTQs) Critical To Quality parameters and the current state of textile digital printing technology is given by substrate type and end user application, including the latest Fujifilm technology. Based on the (VOC) Voice Of the Customer the requirements and drivers for next generation digital textile inks are presented.
    12:15
    Ultrasonic production of nano-size dispersions and emulsions
    Hielscher Ultrasonics
    Ultrasound is a well-established method for particle size reduction in dispersions and emulsions. Ultrasonic processors are used in the generation of nano-size material slurries, dispersions and emulsions because of the potential in the de-agglomeration and reduction of primaries. These are the mechanical effects of ultrasonic cavitation. Ultrasound can also be used to influence chemical reactions by the cavitational energy. This is sonochemistry. As the market for nano-size materials grows, the demand for ultrasonic processes at production level increases. At this stage, energy efficiency becomes important. Since the energy is required per weight or volume of processed material, the process volume links directly to the equipment size required. Therefore, the optimisation of the process efficiency is essential to reduce investment and operational costs. Furthermore, it is required to scale the lab and bench-top configurations to this final level without any variations in the process achievements. Scale up by power alone will not do this.
    12:45
    Inline particle size measurement with 180° DLS
    Particle Metrix
    In many manufacturing processes of dispersions, like printing inks or inkjet inks, there is a growing demand to measure the dispersions during the production in real time. This allows a very good and energy-efficient manufacturing. Furthermore, by continuous measurement an excellent quality assurance of process and end product will be given. A common measurement method of inkjet inks is measuring the particle size of the pigment which has a direct influence on the colour. The new IPAS sensor head, can be directly integrated in the manufacturing process for particle sizing. First tests with the new IPAS sensor head have already been done and published. A sample with a size of 300 nm particle diameter was measured in an unstirred sample with the normal DLS sensor and also in a stirred sample with the IPAS sensor head. In these test measurements we can see very well that the new IPAS sensor head can now be used in moved media.
    13:15
    LUNCH
    14:30
    Image enhancement techniques
    Global Inkjet Systems
    Does inkjet no longer fear the printer’s loupe? The print quality achievable now is the result of years of development – and software is playing an increasing role. This presentation will cover camera feedback and feed forward data handling, nozzle out correction strategies, per nozzle density correction curves, flexible grey scale drop separation, hard and soft stitch technology, and high precision linearization and ink limiting.
    15:00
    Printing 4.0: What is the impact of the fourth industrial revolution on digital printing?
    Wifag-Polytype
    The fourth industrial revolution has generated a lot of interest and media coverage recently. Digitalisation is inherently part of the transition from conventional printing to digital printing. Due to that fact, the printing industry is probably among the most advanced sectors – at least as far as digitalisation of business processes or customer interaction (“web-to-print”) are concerned. But what about the printing machines themselves? What are the general trends in the industry and how can they be applied to a digital printing machine? How can information generated in the print shop be collected, analysed and visualised on superior systems? How can machine operators be assisted with automatic systems for job preparation or machine maintenance? What impact does variable data printing have on the overall digitalisation of a physical product? Wifag//Polytype Technologies are often confronted with these very questions and are working together with their customers to meet the demanding innovation requirements of the market.
    15:30
    From printing models to practical solutions: Understanding printing speed constraints and improving image quality in real scanning printers
    Meteor Inkjet
    Printing is a multidisciplinary process that requires the correct integration of different technologies in a single machine. Invariably, a number of engineering solutions are needed to facilitate the integration of multiple components with real world tolerances and limitations. Starting with an abstract concept of an ideal printing device, we will explore the effect of introducing real-world components into our ideal printer. We will look at how this forces us to make pragmatic design decisions and devise software and hardware techniques to compensate for the non-ideal behaviour of real printer components. To limit the scope of the presentation, we will concentrate on how the introduction of inkjet printheads as a means to generate an image constrains the printing speed, and, how limitations in the accuracy/repeatability of the transport system impairs image quality. We will quickly describe some software and hardware mitigation strategies to recover image quality.
    16:00
    COFFEE BREAK
    16:30
    Semiconductor packaging is changing due to inkjet technology
    Meyer Burger
    Unlike with traditional dispense technologies, inkjet deposits a large number of very small droplets (picoliter volume) of functional liquid materials on a substrate. Thousands of individually addressable nozzles are utilised to dispense these materials in a non-contact way. The technology enables digitally patterned layers as well as homogeneous layers, even on 3D surfaces and 3D structures. Besides, in advanced semiconductor packaging, these benefits are recognised in many other industries such as printed circuit board (PCB), photovoltaics (PV), display, 3D printing and even pharmaceutics where inkjet technology finds its way into industrial manufacturing. The feature size of inkjet printing is not compatible with semiconductor front-end processes because sub-micron patterning is required. However, many wafer based back-end-of-line and strip based packaging process steps need features of tens of microns up to millimetres, and can benefit from inkjet. Therefore inkjet printing is being adopted by some of the largest semiconductor producers in the world. This paper will review the advantages of inkjet in comparison to traditional technologies, give an overview of inkjet compatible materials and highlight two application examples of the technology.
    17:00
    The use of Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSP) in the development of inkjet inks
    ChemStream
    ChemStream uses Hansen Solubility Parameters in the development of inkjet inks. This lecture will demonstrate some different approaches of Hansen to successfully obtain ink stability, process performance and ink-substrate interactions. The Hansen Solubility Parameters position each molecule in the 3-dimensional ‘space of solubility’ based on 3 main characteristics: a dispersive component (D), a polar component (P), and a hydrogen bonding component (H). A solubility sphere can be defined, for each of the molecules, from which the radius is a measure of its solubility. These parameters are thus applied in the inkjet ink development process at ChemStream in order to improve nano-dispersion stability, material compatibility, ink-media interactions etc.
    17:30
    Novel system design for UV curing of width from 3” to 90”
    Heraeus Noblelight
    While conventional printing declines, the transition from an analogue to digital world accelerates – which is being reflected in the growth of digital printing applications and opportunities. Alexander Link will talk about novel system design for UV curing of widths from 3 to 90 inches. Listen to innovations like the scalable plug & play concept which gives the curing process freedom in design. He will explain the impact of power balancing on the uniformity of the UV light and will compare state-of-the-art UV LED solutions with conventional UV LED systems and standard medium pressure lamps.
    18:00
    High-speed inkjet printing process monitoring
    Dantec Dynamics
    New emerging industrial applications in inkjet printing as for example printed electronics, OLED display printing or printing of sensors, just to name a few, entail new challenges for process control and calibration of inkjet printing systems. For example, nozzle calibration and control for the printing process, where important parameters, like droplet size, velocity and trajectory are monitored. With IPS, a new laser measurement method is introduced that provides several advantages, for example swift nozzle calibration and real-time monitoring of high frequency droplet ejection that enable a closed-loop process control of printing processes for higher quality printing results and save costs. The method is detailed by showing results of a demo measurement of an inkjet printing process on a micro drop printing device.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
    22:00
    CLOSING DAY 1
  • DAY 1 - Track 3 (24.10.2017)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    09:00
    WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    Expanding the boundaries with continuous inkjet
    Plenary session
    Kodak
    Vision to Reality over 50 years… Since 1967, Kodak has developed a unique variety of inkjet called Continuous Inkjet which has revolutionised the digital printing world. CIJ, with its speed and reliability was the first to bring true hybrid digital/offset printing into the mainstream. Now, 50 years later, Kodak digital presses and components, monochrome and colour, have been installed around the world in a variety of commercial, publishing, newspaper and packaging applications. Kodak CIJ is unprecedented in its speed, image quality and running cost. With a droplet generator of over 400KHz, Kodak is printing with single print arrays with Stream Inkjet Technology at speeds beyond 300 mpm and with the best production inkjet image quality, with round and uniform drops and high degree of drop placement accuracy. Due to Kodak’s nano-particulate pigment inks combined with continuous flow of ink through the nozzles, Kodak’s inks are easier to dry and can print on glossy substrates and even films and plastics with water-based inks. Now with Kodak ULTRASTREAM Inkjet Technology, customers in packaging, home décor, and industrial markets can also migrate the mainstream of their work from analogue to digital. As Kodak celebrates 50 years in the industry and the expansion of technology into the future.
    09:45
    Advanced bulk piezo ceramics technology for high performance industrial inkjet printhead
    Plenary session
    Kyocera
    Most of industrial inkjet printheads are driven with piezoelectric actuator made by sintering bulk of material composition over 1000 C° or forming thin film by material deposition or sol-gel method over 600 C°. In case of bulk piezo ceramics, grain boundaries are bonded firmly through high temperature process to complete chemical reaction even in microscopic level although it requires special technology to build it into micro mechanical systems. On the other hand, thin film piezo can be applied for fine patterning but have more chance of ion migration or friction among grains due to looser grain boundary by relatively lower process temperature. Kyocera chose the bulk piezo technology as a power source of the industrial inkjet printhead due to its essential reliability, and has been optimizing the formulation as well as processes to realize high performance. Background stories of proven technology in the market are to be introduced.
    10:15
    Advances in nozzle architecture design, driven by Silicon MEMS capabilities and freedoms, to deliver next generation inkjet printheads
    Plenary session
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    Leveraging over 30 years of printhead design, Fujifilm Dimatix continue to push the boundaries of what can be done with the technology and processes to enable piezo inkjet technology to leap forward in capabilities and performance to address the ever increased demands from the market.
    Leading the evolution of Silicon MEMS printhead development, at their in-house wafer-fab facility in Santa Clara, California, over the last 10 years Fujifilm Dimatix has delivered meaningful innovation in the technology with:
    - Sputtered PZT; to deliver exceptional nozzle life and performance stability over time
    - Nozzle level Ink recirculation; leading to increased reliability and sustainability
    - Structurally hard and robust nozzle plates; for increased resilience from head strikes
    - Durable non-wetting nozzle plate coatings; for exceptional drop ejection behavior and improved sustainability
    - Robust, chemically inert material sets; eliminating adhesive layers within the nozzle plate structure to produce a highly stable, uniform and robust monolithic structure.
    Fujifilm Dimatix will use this presentation to outline how, with the development of proprietary modeling tools and utilizing the flexibility of the MEMS manufacturing processes, has enabled Dimatix to evolve their designs to manufacture highly desirable nozzle geometries, delivering higher jet speeds, flatter frequency responses and more stable long life performance.
    10:45
    Thermal inkjet printhead technology for industrial print
    Plenary session
    HP
    Thermal inkjet has been a staple of consumer and office printing for three decades. HP is using its scalable printhead technology to grow into industrial applications. This talk will review some basics of thermal inkjet and discuss the variety of HP system designs used across several large and small industrial markets. It will conclude by describing the key technical factors contributing to HP thermal inkjet’s success in industrial packaging applications.
    11:15
    COFFEE BREAK
    11:45
    Multi-purpose picodrop dosing system for fast and easy testing of ink-substrate interactions and printing behaviour
    Dataphysics
    In order to study printing behaviour, it is advisable to emulate the printing process as far as possible which means in particular that a “printer-like” dispensing system should be used. DataPhysics provides such a dispensing system, namely the picodrop dosing system PDDS, which has originally been developed for contact angle measurement on very small testing spots. The PDDS is able to dispense liquid droplets of down to 30 pl – which is obviously well in the range of droplets created by inkjet printheads. Moreover, the PDDS dispenses these droplets via acoustic pulses with frequencies of up to 10000 Hz such that the system indeed perfectly simulates a printer head. Of course, varying the amplitude and width of the piezo-pulses allows to modify the dispensed drop volume. Hence, fast and reliable contact angle measurements for the testing of ink-substrate interactions are easily possible.
    12:15
    3D jet straightness analysis by image analysis in different focal planes
    iPrint
    One of the most important jetting properties of high quality inkjet printing systems is the jet straightness of the printheads. Dependent on the used printhead the total deviation of printed dots has a systematic error part which can be related mainly to jet straightness errors and a stochastic part that is usually smaller in magnitude. If the average jet straightness errors of a printhead are known, the total printed dot positon errors can be reduced to the level of stochastic errors by software compensation in multiple passes. Current systems to measure the jet straightness in three coordinates (e.g. print direction, cross-print direction and distance from the nozzle plate) need to scan the printhead nozzle by nozzle with two 90° oriented cameras which is in terms of measurement duration impractical for integration in industrial print machines. With a system that analyses droplets of multiple nozzles in different parallel focal planes, the actual positions and velocities in 3D of all seen droplets can be measured simultaneously by either analysing the sharpness function of drops (similar to focus systems in mobile phone cameras) or by measuring the change in magnification with a non-telecentric lens and double flashing. As jet straightness measurements of multiple nozzles can be carried out in parallel the total time to assess a complete printhead can be reduced significantly. As such a system can operate from a single viewpoint, integration in print machines is simplified and by analysing in the printing gap continuous measurement during printing is possible.
    12:45
    Automatic optical inspection in operation in a 2.250mm wide single pass printing line
    Baumer Inspection
    Baumer Inspection has developed an innovative scanner for digital printing. This inspection system detects all flaws in the single pass printing process and gives alarm in case of process related prob-lems like blocked nozzles. During TheIJC 2016, Baumer has given a presentation regarding the de-sign and development and the target to be achieved with that novel scanner. We spoke about the development of special cameras, about fast flashing LED illumination of special spectra and about grading the visibility of a defect detected. Now, the first system is installed in a single pass Hymmen line with a printing width of 2,250 mm. We will give information about the feedback of our client, how the system is detecting defects without the need of comparing images, how the system is switching from one décor to the next at the clock rate of the printing machine, how it is detecting flaws without the need of a Teach-in procedure, about accuracy and sensitivity of inspection and about the next steps of further developments.
    13:15
    LUNCH
    14:30
    Controlling the destructive forces experienced by functional materials during inkjet printing
    University of Cambridge
    The presentation will highlight how principles from the pharma and biopharma industries can be applied to the digital ink manufacturing process enhancing quality and efficiency. The analysis of the rheology changes due to high flux rates and shear will be discussed.
    15:00
    Inkjet printing for control of pharmaceutical polymorphism
    University College London
    Polymorph selection of pharmaceuticals is critical for the performance and stability of medicines. In order to select the most appropriate polymorph for development, it is vital to be able to screen, isolate and characterise metastable crystalline forms. Inkjet printing offers much potential in this area, because the small volumes of drug solutions that can be jetted mean crystallisation occurs rapidly and in volumetric confinement. Here, the use of inkjet printing to isolate metastable forms of a number of pharmaceuticals will be discussed. Methods of characterisation of the printed crystals, including Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, will also be introduced.
    15:30
    Electrostatic printing for industrial packaging: New developments in direct-to-shape beverage can printing
    Tonejet
    Tonejet is a unique electrostatic deposition process that is set to revolutionise the printing of beverage cans. Combining a thin, flexible ink layer with a conventional over-print varnish, Tonejet is a cost effective digital print technology that is compatible with the forming processes in the metal packaging industry. Replicating the look and feel of traditional analogue can printing, while unlocking the potential for small and variable print runs, Tonejet is well matched to the needs of the burgeoning craft beer industry. This presentation will introduce Tonejet printing technology, from the fundamentals of the electrostatic ejection process to its application in industrial packaging printing.
    16:00
    COFFEE BREAK
    16:30
    Prevention of inkjet nozzle clogging
    Soliton/PSS
    A common cause of failure in inkjet printing is clogging of the jet nozzle by oversized pigment or foreign large particulates. Manufacturers are always looking for changes in formulation, production, and QC to ensure that the ink will pass through nozzles without blockage. Many techniques are available for sizing particles, but most only provide information on size and relative concentration, not absolute concentration. Single Particle Optical Sizing, SPOS, sizes and counts each particle that passes through the detection zone, providing much a higher resolution and quantitative accuracy than most calculated methods, allowing for significant improvements in final product. A brief introduction to the SPOS technique will be presented, followed by examples of measurements made on a variety of inkjet inks at various stages of processing, showing how this data can be used to improve inks from the formulation stage, through production, and ultimately to the printed product.
    17:00
    Inkjet and aerosol jet in the field of microtechnology
    Hahn-Schickard Society
    We will show the possibilities for pre- and post- processing techniques such as plasma treatment or photonic sintering to optimise adhesion and electrical conductivity of the printed functionalities. Furthermore we will give some examples of printed electronics which were developed in different projects: temperature sensors, humidity sensors, touch sensors, strain gauges, antennas, heaters, electrodes
    17:30
    Making digital technologies accessible for textile SMEs
    TexZeppelin
    The rapid development of digital printing technologies has transformed textile printing and created vibrant business opportunities by leveraging many new trends and technologies on the level of software, hardware and inkjet inks. Existing and starting SME-companies explore the latest digital textile and garment printing technologies that enhance their competitiveness. However, there are still a lot of challenges to overcome to benefit fully of the many advantages inherently linked to digital technologies. Bottleneck, especially for SMEs, is actually their dependence on external commission finishers for the ready-to-print textile and for functional post treatments (read: repellency, antimicrobial…) slowing down the production chain. Moreover, this dependence inhibits their huge business potential. This lecture focuses on many actual and future developments in digital technologies and on different issues such as in-line pretreatments and digital finishing/coating which make in-house production possible. Also digital dyeing is an actual issue for many SMEs.
    18:00
    Inkjet printing technology for printing functional layers
    Chemnitz University of Technology
    Inkjet printing allows the deposition of liquids only at positions where they are needed at a certain time. During the last years, this technology has been increasingly used for the deposition of various functional materials, e.g. in the field of printed and flexible electronics, for medical applications or even for functional 3D objects. The talk will give an overview about the variety of inkjet-printed functional patterns such as electronic devices (e.g. resistors, capacitors, diodes, antennas and thin-film transistors), printed sieves for filter applications, printed self-assembled monolayers and others. The talk will also consider the up-scaling of the manufacturing process based on inkjet printing, e.g. of all-inkjet-printed electronic devices in order to address the process yield and thus the reliability of the inkjet printing process for electronics.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
    22:00
    CLOSING DAY 1
  • DAY 2 - Track 1 (25.10.2017)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    09:00
    WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    Widening the window: Powerdrop’s approach to opening up inkjet
    Plenary session
    Archipelago Technology
    The last five years have seen great advances in inkjet and the arrival of MEMS based heads is heralding the next stage in inkjet evolution. However, modern inkjet printheads require specialised inks which do not by themselves deliver everything that customers require in terms of physical robustness and flexibility. Archipelago’s Powerdrop technology has been created to complement inkjet and lay down functional materials that both widen substrate latitude and improve the final appearance and robustness of the image. The Powerdrop print drum can eject many sticky and viscous functional materials such as UV varnish, corrosive pre-coats and even hot melt adhesives. In this talk, Dan Mace, Archipelago’s COO, will update you on the latest developments and explain how Powerdrop can greatly expand the applications for large scale inkjet and industrial printing.
    09:45
    Open the window wider with RC1536-L
    Plenary session
    Seiko Instruments
    Thanks to the success of RC1536, especially in the ceramic tile industry, we are receiving more demands for many different industrial applications. We aimed to expand RC1536 possibilities to be able to follow those industries’ requirements, then we have developed new printhead RC1536-L in addition to the RC series. This time at TheIJC, we would like to show even enlarged variation of jetting characteristics and additional ways of use of RC1536-L, which enable to expand opportunities of the inkjet technology in real industrial situations.
    10:15
    New print mode developments for high productivity and laydown using Xaar printheads
    Plenary session
    Xaar
    Previously reported was the capability of Xaar’s Platform 3 printheads incorporating short channel, double ended actuators and Xaar’s TF Technology® to achieve high productivity printing. Xaar has now developed a number of patented printing modes which significantly increase the productivity over its standard ‘3-cycle’ mode printing. The new modes of operation increase productivity and laydown by more than 5 times and enable these printheads to offer benefits for a number of applications such as printing of ‘special effects’, Braille and 3D printing. Details of the new printing modes will be discussed.
    10:45
    COFFEE BREAK
    11:15
    An Introduction to high speed inkjet print inspection and verification
    Lake Image Systems
    The evolution of inkjet in the label, packaging and commercial print world is presenting great opportunities for more personalized, unique, short run, high value print jobs. As a result the inspection technology used in these applications needs to follow, and evolve. The requirement for general print quality inspection, where every repeat must be the same has changed. The challenge is now that every repeat can be different, but must be correct. Data and sequencing issues, missing or blocked jets and out of sync engines, along with the more traditional colour registration and variations issues can quickly result in production integrity and print errors. This results in the items being discarded and re-printed, increasing waste and costs. If the defective print goes out unchecked, the repercussions (for the printer and their clients) could be substantial financial penalties, lengthy legal disputes, lost productivity, higher operational costs, lost revenue and worse still, poor publicity, reputations, and loss of future business. This session presents an overview of the latest technologies and solutions used to identify, read, print and verify inkjet printed materials with a few real life examples.
    11:45
    Avoiding the orange peel
    Global Graphics Software
    An update on mitigating texture artifacts on inkjet presses using halftone screens: streaking, coalescence, tone steps and the dreaded orange peel mottling. But improved screening reveals other imperfections, a bit like HD TV; so what are the next steps?
    12:15
    Digital coatings: Markets and technologies
    TTP
    Three technology groups exist to address established markets for digital decoration and marking: drop on demand inkjet, continuous inkjet and valve jet. These technologies occupy very different capability spaces in terms of drop size (and hence image resolution), firing frequency (and hence throughput) and fluid rheology. They serve the needs of most decoration and coding markets well. End users requiring viscous or particulate-laden fluids to be deposited digitally are being held back however. Emerging markets that fit this profile include additive manufacturing, adhesives for garment and footwear manufacturing, functional coatings for textiles, flooring and furniture, automotive and aerospace painting, security printing, bio-printing and high quality metallic decoration of packaging. Technologies that can operate in this space include TTP’s Vista and Touchspray printheads, Archipelago’s Powercoat, and Alchemie’s Jetronica. This talk will examine both the markets mentioned and the technologies offered, concluding that we are seeing the emergence of a new category of inkjet device for functional printing.
    12:45
    LUNCH
    14:00
    Industrial inkjet printing solutions from the perspective of the ink design
    AGFA
    The performance of industrial inkjet printing processes is strongly dependent upon the design of the inkjet inks. The printing solution is a system approach wherein the ink is tuned to the print system, the application as well as the full production process of the industrial product. The relation of the ink to the key elements on the performance will be explained, especially by using multiple real life examples.
    14:30
    Contactless cleaning of printhead
    NTS Group
    Every print process requires the cleaning of the printhead. With the JetClean module the cleaning is done without touching the printhead which extends the lifetime of printhead. The automated JetClean wiping and flushing functions reduce the maintenance time and human error, increasing the printer uptime and predictable print quality.
    15:00
    The triple challenge: Inkjet, pigment and textiles
    CHT R. Beitlich
    Within the past ten years inkjet has heavily affected the trillion-dollar textile industry. With the advent of recirculating heads, pigment inks containing binders reached industrial maturity and are starting to be installed in major print houses around the world. Having mastered the combination of inkjet and pigments, one tends to overlook the effect of textile substrates which is indeed the third challenge. Within this technical presentation, the textile process chain from yarn to finished fabric will be described and pre-treatment solutions will be presented which allow brilliant and durable prints on a variety of fabrics.
    15:30
    COFFEE BREAK
    16:00
    Filtration, degassing and oxygen measurement technologies for inkjet printing applications
    Pall
    Filtration and degasification are key technology requirements for digital printing. Finer resolution and higher printing speed as well as changing ink chemistries and substrates are the challenging factors of today. Controlling of further parameters like dissolved oxygen become more important. This presentation will provide an overview of the filtration and degassing methodology and technology on board of digital ink jet printers, including specific product type recommendations and how to ensure keeping parameters under control.
    Advantage of DO-measurement in the lab and online on board of the printer
    UMS
    Fast printing heads demand precise conditioning of ink. A low dissolved oxygen level is one of the major characteristics of an appropriate conditioned printing ink. For 15 years, UMS has been offering proven and easy to handle oxygen sensors and meters for the printing industry. The presentation will show some measuring tools and will explain how to use them.
    16:30
    Inkjet ink for printing on flexible packaging
    Armor Industrial Inks
    The presentation will cover the following topics: Requirements and challenges in aqueous inks for non-porous surfaces, i.e. flexible packaging; substrate compatibility, pre- and post-treatment methods and suitable curing technologies; regulatory obstacles; high-speed jetting of aqueous inks on industrial printheads; nozzle-open-time (printhead) vs. drying time (substrate); overview of competing technologies, i.e. electrophotography or laser.
    17:00
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
    17:30
    CLOSING DAY 2
  • DAY 2 - Track 2 (25.10.2017)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    09:00
    WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    Widening the window: Powerdrop’s approach to opening up inkjet
    Plenary session
    Archipelago Technology
    The last five years have seen great advances in inkjet and the arrival of MEMS based heads is heralding the next stage in inkjet evolution. However, modern inkjet printheads require specialised inks which do not by themselves deliver everything that customers require in terms of physical robustness and flexibility. Archipelago’s Powerdrop technology has been created to complement inkjet and lay down functional materials that both widen substrate latitude and improve the final appearance and robustness of the image. The Powerdrop print drum can eject many sticky and viscous functional materials such as UV varnish, corrosive pre-coats and even hot melt adhesives. In this talk, Dan Mace, Archipelago’s COO, will update you on the latest developments and explain how Powerdrop can greatly expand the applications for large scale inkjet and industrial printing.
    09:45
    Open the window wider with RC1536-L
    Plenary session
    Seiko Instruments
    Thanks to the success of RC1536, especially in the ceramic tile industry, we are receiving more demands for many different industrial applications. We aimed to expand RC1536 possibilities to be able to follow those industries’ requirements, then we have developed new printhead RC1536-L in addition to the RC series. This time at TheIJC, we would like to show even enlarged variation of jetting characteristics and additional ways of use of RC1536-L, which enable to expand opportunities of the inkjet technology in real industrial situations.
    10:15
    New print mode developments for high productivity and laydown using Xaar printheads
    Plenary session
    Xaar
    Previously reported was the capability of Xaar’s Platform 3 printheads incorporating short channel, double ended actuators and Xaar’s TF Technology® to achieve high productivity printing. Xaar has now developed a number of patented printing modes which significantly increase the productivity over its standard ‘3-cycle’ mode printing. The new modes of operation increase productivity and laydown by more than 5 times and enable these printheads to offer benefits for a number of applications such as printing of ‘special effects’, Braille and 3D printing. Details of the new printing modes will be discussed.
    10:45
    COFFEE BREAK
    11:15
    Brand colour communication in digital printing workflows
    ColorGATE
    The consideration of brand colour communication is critical for a growing amount of print products that are being produced by digital printing systems. Most prominently this is the package printing market with corrugated card boards and folding cartons, as well as labels and direct to object printing. The transition from analogue to digital printing for such packaging applications requires to master the challenges of reproducing brand colours with a given process colour ink combination, rather than deploying a specifically mixed spot ink to match a specified spot colour. Gamut extended ink sets improve the general colour capabilities in order to reproduce a spot colour but also need specific attention and control. The speaker is outlining alternative approaches how to master these challenges.
    11:45
    Recent experimental advances in characterising inks and substrates optimising inkjet processes and ink adhesion
    Krüss
    Inkjet printing processes are governed by the solid-liquid interactions between ink and nozzle and ink and substrate. In particular, due to the large range of very different substrates, a proper adjustment of the ink to the substrate properties is important to ensure a proper print image preventing e.g. fuzzy images due to excessive drop spreading or Marangoni-effect driven coffee stain effects. We will explain and illustrate on customer examples, how state-of-the-art dynamic surface tension and picoliter sessile drop contact angle measurements help to adjust inks to certain printing processes. In addition, we provide ideas how interfacial rheology measurements can be useful to gain insight into Marangoni flows during evaporation. Also, considering the polar and disperse parts of the inks’ surface tension and the substrates’ surface free energy can help significantly optimising not only the print image, but also the durability, i.e. long term stability of a particular ink-substrate pairing, as will be illustrated in this presentation. Further, we will demonstrate on the example of polyethylene and polypropylene when and why test-inks (i.e. dyne pens) fail to monitor the efficiency of plasma and/or corona pre-treatments and how modern contact angle measurements can prevent substrate overtreatment and thus assuring best durability of a coating. In this context, we will also illustrate how the recently patented liquid needle dosing technique facilitates high speed contact angle measurements, in that possible error sources still present in traditional contact angle techniques are intrinsically excluded and thereby provide substrate’s surface free energy data of highest reproducibility and best comparability combined with greatest ease-of use.
    12:15
    NIR drying in high-performance inkjet printing
    Lambda Technology
    Drying is an integral building block in industrial printing processes to achieve the desired results. The presentation shows the relationships between substrate, ink and time. We show the interaction between wave length, reflection, absorption and air management, which together are important parameters for achieving the best results. In order to be able to react optimally to the most diverse colour and substrate combinations, flexible instruments with a high degree of efficiency are required. The systems developed by Lambda Technology allow a very exact adaptation of all parameters to the production machine and thus offers an efficient tool for system integration.
    12:45
    LUNCH
    14:00
    LED-boosters and waterborne UV resins: Solutions for next generation inkjet inks
    Allnex
    In this presentation, we will cover two recent developments that support leading edge UV inkjet inks. The first development solves the LED UV surface curing issue with an LED booster approach intended for 100% UV inkjet inks. The second development concurs the expense, odour and regulatory issues associated with mono functional monomers through the use of waterborne UV curable resins.
    14:30
    The evolution of UV-LED curing: Where next?
    Integration Technology
    With increasing efficiencies, higher installed base and new application fields, UV-LED is the shooting star of curing technologies. As the technology evolves available power of UV-LEDs is no longer the limiting factor of the curing systems. With powers exceeding 30W/cm² at 395nm, the demand for variability, size and cooling become stronger and stronger. We will have a look at the new demands to a UV-LED system regarding optimised yield, efficiency, modularity as well as the preparation for industry 4.0.
    15:00
    How big data may be applied to digital print industry
    Caldera
    After 25 years of evolution, the business logic of digital print users is still very diversified. Every Print Service Provider (aka PSP) has a different scale combined with different application also combined with a different business model. Almost everyone is guided by its own business expertise. The challenge for a software company like Caldera is to provide added value to customers, by giving them the keys to optimise automatically their workflow. Because of the wide variety of behaviours met between our 10 000+ RIP users, going from the small local print shop to huge industrial workflows, we took the turn of the Machine Learning exploration in order to solve problems that are less and less linear.
    15:30
    COFFEE BREAK
    16:00
    Optimising the manufacturing process of bulk digital ink
    Amazon Filters
    The presentation will highlight how principles from the pharma and biopharma industries can be applied to the digital ink manufacturing process enhancing quality and efficiency. The analysis of the rheology changes due to high flux rates and shear will be discussed.
    16:30
    Reducing bubble formation in inks: Membrane contactor design and process considerations
    3M
    As digital inkjet technology continues to revolutionise the printing industry, controlling dissolved gases in inks has become a critical consideration to help reduce the risk of process interruption and quality. 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ SP Series Membrane Contactors provide a simple, in-line solution designed to reduce microbubble formation that could lead to nozzle misfires and defects. Several factors should be considered when degassing with membrane contactors, such as the characteristics of the ink, the inkjet hydraulics and the print head. In addition to these factors, membrane contactor characteristics and design aspects, such as mechanics and hydrodynamics, should also be considered. Today, Liqui-Cel membrane contactors are used around the world on ceramic, textile, large format graphics and other inkjet printers to help promote a faster, smoother printing process.
    17:00
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
    17:30
    CLOSING DAY 2
  • DAY 2 - Track 3 (25.10.2017)

    Time Topic Speakers Company
    09:00
    WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    Widening the window: Powerdrop’s approach to opening up inkjet
    Plenary session
    Archipelago Technology
    The last five years have seen great advances in inkjet and the arrival of MEMS based heads is heralding the next stage in inkjet evolution. However, modern inkjet printheads require specialised inks which do not by themselves deliver everything that customers require in terms of physical robustness and flexibility. Archipelago’s Powerdrop technology has been created to complement inkjet and lay down functional materials that both widen substrate latitude and improve the final appearance and robustness of the image. The Powerdrop print drum can eject many sticky and viscous functional materials such as UV varnish, corrosive pre-coats and even hot melt adhesives. In this talk, Dan Mace, Archipelago’s COO, will update you on the latest developments and explain how Powerdrop can greatly expand the applications for large scale inkjet and industrial printing.
    09:45
    Open the window wider with RC1536-L
    Plenary session
    Seiko Instruments
    Thanks to the success of RC1536, especially in the ceramic tile industry, we are receiving more demands for many different industrial applications. We aimed to expand RC1536 possibilities to be able to follow those industries’ requirements, then we have developed new printhead RC1536-L in addition to the RC series. This time at TheIJC, we would like to show even enlarged variation of jetting characteristics and additional ways of use of RC1536-L, which enable to expand opportunities of the inkjet technology in real industrial situations.
    10:15
    New print mode developments for high productivity and laydown using Xaar printheads
    Plenary session
    Xaar
    Previously reported was the capability of Xaar’s Platform 3 printheads incorporating short channel, double ended actuators and Xaar’s TF Technology® to achieve high productivity printing. Xaar has now developed a number of patented printing modes which significantly increase the productivity over its standard ‘3-cycle’ mode printing. The new modes of operation increase productivity and laydown by more than 5 times and enable these printheads to offer benefits for a number of applications such as printing of ‘special effects’, Braille and 3D printing. Details of the new printing modes will be discussed.
    10:45
    COFFEE BREAK
    11:15
    Eco-friendly roll-to-roll solution for digital pigment printing on textiles
    University of Applied Sciences Niederrhein
    In this lecture, the ecological advantages of digital pigment printing on textiles are emphasised compared to traditional printing methods and digital printing processes using reactive inks. In this context, the Research Institute for Textile and Clothing of Hochschule Niederrhein (FTB) and the company Multi-Plot Europe GmbH are working on offering a compact and operational digital printing system (roll-to-roll) using pigment inks for medium scale industrial production. Finally, a whole digitalised process chain in digital pigment printing is supposed to be introduced, which can be used by the customer with high flexibility, reliability and eco-efficiency. Essential quality characteristics of the print which have to be tested are contour sharpness, colour brilliance, haptics as well as fastness to light, rubbing and washing. Remarkable results to fulfil specific requirements in these assessment fields are demonstrated here.
    11:45
    Understanding UV output
    Phoseon
    Curing with Ultraviolet (UV) Energy is a complex process combining materials, chemistry and photons. There are many resources on the web that describe the process thoroughly. This presentation will focus on developing and understanding irradiance, energy density and power, which are three separate but inter-related items that impact an adhesive, coatings or ink’s ability to cure properly.
    12:15
    Inkjet ink characterisation
    ImageXpert
    Development of high quality inks and fluids, printers, and printheads requires state-of-the-art characterisation equipment and techniques. It is vital to understand how the developed ink actually behaves, both on ejection from the printhead and when landing onto the substrate of choice. We will provide an introduction to these essential areas of study, including basic considerations for ink and waveform design, as well as important tests used to verify the performance of a new ink. We will also provide a survey of the key equipment that makes up a test printing rig, including dropwatcher, ink supply, printhead, print controller, and belt or linear stage, for creating test and sample prints. At TheIJC 2017, we will be introducing brand new options for the first time, including a new vacuum belt for test and sample printing, a fully integrated system for mist extraction, and a newly developed high magnification camera tool for nozzle inspection.
    12:45
    LUNCH
    14:00
    Inkjet texturing for effective surface embossing
    Kuei
    Inkjet has reached outstanding printing quality and it is rapidly replacing traditional analogue printing in many industries. Especially when reproducing natural material such as wood and stones, a good print is not enough as people need sensing and touching the material. We are proud to show our latest development which allows to combine exceptional printing with in-registration 3D texturing bringing material to life.
    14:30
    Advances in water based ink solutions
    Kao Collins
    There has always been a desire to substitute water based printing solutions for solvent based solutions. Water is inexpensive, odourless and safe. That desire has only increased as companies look for ways to become more environmentally friendly. Thankfully a range of new polymeric encapsulated pigment dispersions are allowing ink formulators to push the boundaries of inkjet inks. These non-hazardous, non-reactive inks are now able to print high quality robust images onto, among other things, non-absorptive substrates. Those inks when used in conjunction with rapidly developing printhead technology and drying/curing technology are opening new markets and opportunities for inkjet printing including, among other things, flexible packaging for the food and pharmaceutical industries. This presentation explains some of the recent advancements in inkjet inks with a special focus on some of these new pigment dispersions.
    15:00
    Inkjet waveform optimisation by meniscus motion analysis
    iPrint
    Waveform optimisation is a key to success for piezo drop on demand printing systems. The industry-established method for waveform analysis and optimisation is a drop watching analysis. With a drop watching system, usually a large number of droplets has to be jetted for each configuration of the printing system. As inkjet is increasingly being used in functional printing, an increasing number of fluids with a certain toxicity, limited stability or very high material cost are jetted. For such applications there is a need to reduce the amount of wasted fluid. One way to accomplish this is the analysis of the meniscus motion. If a waveform is proportionally scaled down to an amplitude that does not generate drops, acoustic timing can be analysed and optimised by analysing the meniscus motion. An estimation of the frequency – velocity variation can be obtained by analysis of the meniscus motion in the range of actual jetting frequencies. By analysing meniscus oscillations at different pulse amplitudes that are below the drop emission threshold, the voltage necessary to reach a certain drop speed could be estimated. As the same setup as for drop watching analysis can be used for the analysis of meniscus motion, implementation of such an analysis in existing systems is expected to be efficient.
    15:30
    COFFEE BREAK
    16:00
    Revolution of T-shirt printing
    Matsui
    We will show a comparison between “Collaboration of screen printing and inkjet printing” and “PVC Plastisol printing”. PVC Plastisol has good printability because it will not get clogged and is easy to colour match by using a colour matching system. However, we believe that screen + inkjet printing could be even better than PVC Plastisol printing in terms of printability and colour matching. Also, screen + inkjet printing will not have issues that PVC Plastisol printing does, such as hard hand-feel, not ecological, or cracks etc. The productability of screen + inkjet printing has also improved, it now can print 450 shirts per hour. In our presentation, we can show the comparison between those two types of printing in detail.
    16:30
    Experimental set-up to investigate forces and airflows on inkjet droplets
    University of Cambridge
    One of the major challenges in inkjet printing lies in achieving landing accuracy of the droplets. A good the knowledge of the magnitude of the different forces that describe flight of the droplets is key to determining landing position, as well as the behaviour of the airflows around them. However, difficulties in visualising the droplets and, more challenging, their surroundings hinder us from having more reliable data of the printing process. This work focuses on: 1. Exploring cost efficient diagnostic tools to study the airflows and the balance of forces on droplets on flight under different conditions and 2. Giving an overview of the difficulties to overcome to obtain the best possible images. The techniques are based on high speed imaging, laser illumination and PIV. Different conditions of substrate motion or substrate shape can be studied.
    17:00
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
    17:30
    CLOSING DAY 2
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Next InkJet Conference

TheIJC 2017
24-25 October 2017
Düsseldorf/Neuss, Germany

About Us

TheIJC is an ESMA event - ESMA is a leading non-profit European association for printing manufacturers in screen, digital and flexo technology.

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For general information about TheIJC, including EXHIBITOR information, please contact us at:
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